Monday, May 9, 2011

In memory of Chris Hess



In memory of Chris Hess who died early Thursday morning, May 5. This footage, taken by Mary Kay Clark, is from the Presbyterian Church Benefit---"Season's Joy: A Song Book" which took place at the Emporium Dec. 4, 2010. Chris is singing first with her Heartstrings co-musician Marybeth Burkholder and then with her son, Nathan Moore.

Video edited by Susan Gartner

9 comments:

Kathy said...

My friend Chris Hess has left us. Although the years had put some time between us, she will always be a part of me. We sang together and it was always a joy to do it. We sang locally and several times at Canal Street…years ago now. She was a good friend and a very talented musician. We raised our sons together, her son Oliver and my Gabe. She once wrote a song about the kids riding bikes on my driveway. I will miss her very much.

Kathy Verner Moulton

Vic Hess said...

Thank you for placing this online. Christina is still a strong part of our family.

Unknown said...

Sis, I miss you very much. I wish I could have said goodbye before you left, but now I think I know why you didn't let me. The love and memories you have given me will allow me to endure your presence even though you are seperated from us physically. I am glad the pain is gone. I love you Sis with all my heart strings.
Your little brother, Tony

Anonymous said...

Christina was one of the best friends of my life. I will miss her so very much... Her gentle ways, warm smile, and beautiful spirit which filled up a huge room...I know I am a better person from knowing you-she made grad school bearable. Your sweet voice will always echo through my mind, and I will take you with me.. I`ll see ya again and we`ll change venues...(inside joke!) She came to my classroom 2 years ago and made up a song to "Down by the Bay" and used all of my students` names in the song. they were all thrilled and that was just the kind of person she was-a true gem. I do not feel like she is gone...always in my heart...Te amo mi corazon...
Cathleen Tong

Yvonne said...

I was totally surprised by her passing--she will be missed by SO MANY here! Her voice, her musicianship and her wonderful strong yet peaceful personality. My condolences to her family and friends. We have lost a wonderful soul. Bless you, Chris--you are now at peace.

Anonymous said...

The Girl Who Played Guitar

I first met Christina Hess at a café in Athens, Ohio, back in 1975. She walked in with a couple of friends, guitar case in hand, just as I was wrapping up a short set of instrumental pieces. I took a seat while this young woman (barely 21) stepped up to the small stage, strapped a small Yamaha six string over her shoulder and slid the microphone into place.

As I watched this petite, short haired girl--who looked all of 17—setting up, I thought I was about to hear some teeny bopper rendition of “The Cruel War Is Raging” or some other hokey three chord covers of sixties protest songs.

But I was so, so wrong.

Christina started her set with a couple of James Taylor ballads, and then followed those up with several beautiful interpretations of songs by Joni Mitchell and Joan Armatrading. She had a rich tenor voice, and played guitar with all the skill and confidence of Steven Stills. For one of her pieces, she sang the words of a poem by William Wordsworth—“To My Sister”—accompanied by her lilting, opened tuned chords. It was one of the most exquisite songs I’d ever heard.

Her last piece was an Irish ballad by Hoagy Carmichael and Mitchell Parish, “One Morning In May.” The song is about a young girl and a soldier, but it also conveys images of the things Christina loved: music, woodlands, and the sea.

Christina died on an early morning in May after a long illness. But shortly before she passed, she was able to spend two weeks by the sea with the people she loved the most: her sons Oliver, Nathan, and Brendan, and her husband Christopher Moore—the man who loved her unconditionally for more than 25 years.

Jeff Simons

Anonymous said...

Chris taught me to play the guitar when we were 13. We played together for 6 years. We called ourselves, "We Before You." Chris always out-played and out-sang me with her beautiful clear, resonating voice. She could listen to any song and play it. We spent many summer nights during those middle and high school years playing, singing and listening to Simon and Garfunkel, Joni Mitchell, Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young and Judy Collins. We used to climb out the window of her room and sit on the roof of her porch on those hot summer nights just talking after we stopped playing. During the day we would walk around little Spring Valley barefoot and dangle our feet in the 'crick' up the street. Sometimes we would take a picnic to the icy cold, fresh spring behind my uncle's house.

Chris was very industrious and managed to find jobs
in Spring Valley. The first was working at the little, wooden floored grocery. When she would leave, maybe to go out of town with Brian or Victor, I would fill in for her. The hardest job was her paper route. I was so scared of dogs, but she assured me there weren't any out early in the morning. Yeah, right! Nevertheless, she rode that old bike of hers every morning one summer delivering papers. No wonder she was so thin.

We parted ways in college, she to OU, me to Miami, but stayed in touch. Over the years, even though I moved to California, we would see each other when I visited my family. With a good friend, it's like only a moment passes between visits. We enjoyed lunch at The Winds in March and I am so grateful for that last time with her.

Chris will always be in my heart with the memories of our youth together and all the songs that remind me of her.

With Love,

Sue

Connie Buchenroth said...

I remember Chris with such fondness. More than once during the past twenty-plus years Chris and I shared the stage either at Canal Street Tavern or at the coffee house in Yellow Springs. It was always a joy to play music with Chris. Her love for music was complimented by the songs she wrote and her extraordinary guitar playing. In past years, we apparently looked similar and often people would confuse us after hearing either of us play. On more than one occasion, someone came up to me and to tell me how much they enjoyed my set. I have to admit, I was quite flattered, because Chris was a much better musician than I, but eventually, I had to fess up and tell them it was Chris that they heard. Chris was one of the most kind-hearted persons I’ve ever known. Once when I’d written a song and was leery about playing it for anyone, I took my guitar over to Chris’s. When I finished playing it, I was waiting for her to comment on how painful the song was, but instead, she just looked at me and said, “That’s a healing song.” I know that I am not alone missing her music, her sense of humor, and her charm. Connie Buchenroth

Connie Buchenroth said...

I remember Chris with such fondness. More than once during the past twenty-plus years Chris and I shared the stage either at Canal Street Tavern or at the coffee house in Yellow Springs. It was always a joy to play music with Chris. Her love for music was complimented by the songs she wrote and her extraordinary guitar playing. In past years, we apparently looked similar and often people would confuse us after hearing either of us play. On more than one occasion, someone came up to me and to tell me how much they enjoyed my set. I have to admit, I was quite flattered, because Chris was a much better musician than I, but eventually, I had to fess up and tell them it was Chris that they heard. Chris was one of the most kind-hearted persons I’ve ever known. Once when I’d written a song and was leery about playing it for anyone, I took my guitar over to Chris’s. When I finished playing it, I was waiting for her to comment on how painful the song was, but instead, she just looked at me and said, “That’s a healing song.” I know that I am not alone missing her music, her sense of humor, and her charm.