Wednesday, February 29, 2012

Saturday night at Clifton Opera House

The Ohio River Minstrels—(John and Gwenn Noftsger) celebrate our American heritage in story and song on Saturday, March 3rd at the Clifton Opera House. As musicians, singers, historians, and composers, they highlight persons, events and experiences that have helped shape our country's history and its culture. Since 1990, this duo has presented musical Americana programs at festivals, community events, fairs, churches and historical societies throughout the mid-Ohio Valley.

John Noftsger - A veteran of several Bluegrass, gospel and old-time music groups, John accompanies himself on the guitar, banjo, mandolin and/or harmonica as he sings a wide variety of traditional and original songs. Recently, he was featured as Burl in the Miami Valley Dinner Theatre production of the gospel musical comedy "Smoke on the Mountain".

Gwenn Noftsger - Gwenn, who plays the acoustic bucket bass in the duo, comes from a very musical family. Her grandfather, Elza Stone, taught all eleven of his children to play music, so Stone family gatherings were filled with the sounds of the fiddle, banjo, guitar and piano. For several years, in addition to her musical performances, Gwenn has portrayed showboat captain and performer, Callie French, in the role she developed for "Steamboats Remembered in Story and Song" at the Hoosier Theater in Vevay, Indiana,

The box office opens at 6:30, show starts at 7:30pm. Suggested door donation $7.00. The Opera House is located at 5 So Clay Street, Clifton. Call 937-342-2175 for information.

Spring One-Day Workshop on Genre Fiction

Antioch Writers' Workshop

In anticipation of the Antioch Writers' Workshop 27th Annual Summer Workshop, AWW is holding a spring one-day workshop on Saturday, March 31, 8:15 a.m.-6:00 p.m. at Antioch University Midwest in Yellow Springs, Ohio. The full-day workshop will focus on the genres of mystery, science fiction/fantasy/horror, and romance. Published authors in each of these three genres will lead a track on aspects of writing craft specific to his/her genre.

Registration is limited to only 15 participants per genre (45 total participants), so those interested are encouraged to register quickly. (Tracks are filled on first registered, first served basis.) Cost for the one-day spring workshop is $150.00, due upon registration.

Award winning author Carrie Bebris will lead the mystery track. Bebris is best known for her Mr. & Mrs. Darcy Mystery series, most recently The Deception at Lyme. The series debuted in 2004 with Pride and Prescience, which made the Independent Mystery Booksellers Association bestseller list and was named one of the five best mysteries of the year by Library Journal. Several books in the series have earned starred reviews from publications such as Publisher's Weekly.

Donna MacMeans will lead the romance track. MacMeans has published four historical romance, most recently Redeeming the Rogue. Her first published novel, The Education of Mrs. Brimley, won the coveted Golden Heart medallion for Best Long Historical Manuscript presented by Romance Writers of America ® in 2006. Her other novels include The Trouble with Moonlight, The Seduction of a Duke, and the forthcoming The Cassanove Code.

Tim Waggoner, author of more than twenty novels and two short story collections, will lead the science fiction/fantasy/horror track. Waggoner teaches creative writing at Sinclair Community College and in Seton Hill University's Master of Fine Arts in Writing Popular Fiction program. His novels include the zombie PI Matt Richter series:Nekroplis, Dead Streets and Dark War. He has also published numerous short stories and articles on creative writing in magazines such as Writer's Digest and Writers' Journal.

For complete author bios, links to their websites, and a detailed Genre Saturday schedule, visit www.antiochwritersworkshop.com.

Antioch Writers' Workshop programs are held in partnership with Antioch University Midwest and with support from the Yellow Springs Community Foundation; Ohio Arts Council; and WYSO (media sponsor).

Women’s Voices Outloud

Information For the Visual Artists

All art must come ready to hang.

Drop off your art in the Arts and Craft room on the second floor of John Bryan Center.

Please include a tag for the wall, (stating artists name and title of piece) and have taped on the back of your art a separate paper with your name, title and your contact info.

If the Arts and Craft room is locked, the Parks and Rec person in the room on the first floor by the gym will unlock the door for you.

Or bring your art on March 1, around 5 p.m to the second floor of the John Bryan Center.

Please pick up your art on March 31.

Tuesday, February 28, 2012

Smell smoke..?

Not to worry...

MTFR will be conducting a prairie burn in Glen Helen today beginning around 4 PM. The prairie is located off of Grinnell Road near the old covered bridge. The burn is being conducted in conjunction with Glen Helen’s prairie management plan. ChiefAltman anticipates the fire lasting no longer than 1 to 1 ½ hours. During this time, smoke may be visible from the area. He advises that there is no need to panic. The public is welcome to observe from the roadside.

Chilean AFS Exchange Students available

One girl and one boy for next year

This from AFS:

Hello my AFS friends of YS,

I just received this info on these great Chilean students (one boy and one girl) who need a home for next school year. I thought of how Chileans came to YS for short stays in the past through some school program and were so warmly received. I know that some YS people have kept in contact with those Chileans they hosted and even were visited by a YS host sister. Also, I know that Aldo, the Chilean boy hosted by the Hardmans last year, is probably very warmly remembered.

So, I am hoping that there is still some interest in Chileans in YS, and maybe someone will contact me there about hosting one of these AFS'ers. Don't wait very long or they may get taken by another area.

Marla Gamble, Dayton chapter AFS volunteer
233-6190

Muse at Antioch

Community sing and concert with Cincinnati-based women’s choir

Antioch College will host a community sing and concert with MUSE, a Cincinnati-based women’s choir, at 7 p.m. Saturday, March 3, in the South Gym on the College campus. Tickets are not required. Instead, donations of cash and/or non-perishable food items are encouraged and will benefit the Community Food Pantry at the Yellow Springs Methodist Church.

The Community Sing and Concert is a kick-off to Women’s History month. Music selections include anthems to women’s, LGBT, and social justice causes. The concert will feature two 45-minute sets in which MUSE will sing five or six pieces, then lead audience members in a group sing of three or four pieces. Local artists Melissa Heston, Mary White, and the Wheels will join MUSE for various numbers.

Founded in 1984 by Cathy Roma, MUSE is a women’s choir dedicated to musical excellence and social change. The group includes women of varied ages, races, and ethnicities with a range of musical abilities, political interests, and life experiences. MUSE commissions and seeks out music composed by women, pieces written to enhance the sound of women’s voices, and songs that honor the enduring spirit of all peoples. Their performances strive to entertain, inspire, motivate, heal and create a feeling of community with the audience.

MUSE has released five CDs and now performs in about 30 venues each season. The group has grown to 60 singers with a repertoire of more than 100 songs, both original compositions and new choral arrangements.

Friday night at Clifton Opera House

Beracha Valley

The Valley and the River shall be meeting on Friday, March 2nd at 7:30pm. These two fine bluegrass bands are taking the stage and there will be a whole lot of bluegrassing going on! Berachah Valley and Rum River Blend are two of the most sought after bluegrass bands in the region and they are coming to Clifton TOGETHER! Berachah Valley features some fine vocalists, and they truly do harmonize. Jonathan Hamilton will also be joining the group.

Willis Baker plays dobro and provides extensive experience in the local bluegrass scene. Cathy Baker plays rhythm guitar, sings lead and harmony. Michelle Edester continues to blossom with her command of the mandolin. Becky Meyers is an excellent banjo player who is well respected in the Tri-State area. Merrell Boggs also shares his talent on the banjo and dojo. He has also penned many of the songs which we share with audiences. Mike Elliott generates much enthusiasm with his explosive lead guitar breaks. On the bass is Larry Collins, who plays with much pathos with every movement and motion. Leisa Hinkle's instrument is her voice! She can be a song's best friend. She provides lead vocals and group harmonies along with Cathy, Michelle, and Larry.

Rum River Blend, based in Troy, bills themselves as "unprofessional entertainment", they obviously have a great sense of humor. The band takes its name from the Rum River that flows through Linda's hometown of Milaca, Minnesota. They perform a blend of traditional bluegrass, folk, Gospel and children's songs. The audience is encouraged to join in on the fun as kazoos, spoons, washboards, and various other noise making instruments are often passed out to the crowd. You are in for a great time on Friday night!

Box office opens at 6:30pm. Call 937.767.2343 for information or check out the website www.cliftonoperahouse.com Located at 5 So Clay Street, Clifton.

Community Potlucks

Click on image to enlarge.

Monday, February 27, 2012

New Liberty Workshop, Mar. 10

Early Eaters and Late Keepers

The next New Liberty Sustainable Workshop series is March 10, 1-3 p.m. in the basement of the Yellow Springs Methodist Church. This session is on garden planning.

Plan your garden now to harvest early, mid-season and late crops. Learn which varieties allow you to have June potatoes and November tomatoes.

Sunday, February 26, 2012

Back Story: High Noon at the Golden Corral

The first time in this restaurant is a bit overwhelming. The stockyard theme, albeit unintentional, is ubiquitous. We walk through the the front door and are confronted with a maze of guide rails designed to contain the herds of humanity that line up in the lobby to graze in this place. It's the Golden Corral in Beavercreek. We are here because Amy has heard that there is a Chinese woman from Malaysia who works here and wants to meet her. We timed our visit so we would be hungry.

We pay as we enter the buffet - not cheap, $27.50 for the two of us, including a Diet Pepsi and a lemonade. We ask the girl at the register where the woman is working and find her. She is lovely and friendly. She is glad to see us. She shows us to a table.

"I knew from the moment I saw your face that you must be looking for me," she tells Amy. They jabber on in Chinese, both of them smiling all-the-while.

She has worked here for nine years, she tells us. She is happy with her job, as she is able to take three months at-a-time off to travel to Malaysia. When she returns, she still has a job. She likes her regular customers and is clearly proud of this place. She tells us where to find the best stuff - the seafood is over there, cooked to order - the steak is over there, just tell them how you want it - over there are the fried clams and calamari...

I have heard enough. I am off to the fried food. The buffet is crowded. I have to elbow my way in. I load up a plate with onion rings, fried clam strips and calamari. Back at the table, Amy comments on the pile of greasy stuff on my plate and starts moving pieces of it to her own, so I won't eat too much of it.

I go back for steak and chicken. They each look good, but taste remarkably the same. Everything is too salty. The steak is about one-third fat. I look around the room. The mostly redneck clientele is wolfing the stuff down, oblivious to the artery-clogging, trans-fatty nature of the the fare.

I am seated facing a window, looking out on the parking lot. A hunky, tricked-out, Chevy Silverado pulls into a handicapped spot right in front of the window. The driver pays no attention to the lines, parking at an awkward angle. He makes no attempt to correct it. An elderly woman climbs down from the passenger seat, stepping gingerly on the black rubber treads on the chrome exhaust pipes that run the length of the truck. I can't see the driver until he hobbles by the window. He is a skinny little cowpuncher in his nineties. They come inside. A few minutes later, a young dude comes along and eyeballs the pickup like it's been the ride of his dreams for his entire life.

I head for the dessert bar and return with blueberry pie and apple cobbler. I survey the room one last time before we leave. The diners, if I can use that word, are mostly overweight and unkempt. I catch my reflection in the window glass. I haven't shaved in five days and haven't had a haircut in months, maybe a year. I wonder what has happened to me. I look like I fit right in. What is this place, a chuck house for the intelligentsia..?

-vh

Back Story: High Noon at the Golden Corral

The first time in this restaurant is a bit overwhelming. The stockyard theme, albeit unintentional, is ubiquitous. We walk through the the front door and are confronted with a maze of guide rails designed to contain the herds of humanity that line up in the lobby to graze in this place. It's the Golden Corral in Beavercreek. We are here because Amy has heard that there is a Chinese woman from Malaysia who works here and wants to meet her. We timed our visit so we would be hungry.

We pay as we enter the buffet - not cheap, $27.50 for the two of us, including a Diet Pepsi and a lemonade. We ask the girl at the register where the woman is working and find her. She is lovely and friendly. She is glad to see us. She shows us to a table.

"I knew from the moment I saw your face that you must be looking for me," she tells Amy. They jabber on in Chinese, both of them smiling all-the-while.

She has worked here for nine years, she tells us. She is happy with her job, as she is able to take three months at-a-time off to travel to Malaysia. When she returns, she still has a job. She likes her regular customers and is clearly proud of this place. She tells us where to find the best stuff - the seafood is over there, cooked to order - the steak is over there, just tell them how you want it - over there are the fried clams and calamari...

I have heard enough. I am off to the fried food. The buffet is crowded. I have to elbow my way in. I load up a plate with onion rings, fried clam strips and calamari. Back at the table, Amy comments on the pile of greasy stuff on my plate and starts moving pieces of it to her own, so I won't eat too much of it.

I go back for steak and chicken. They each look good, but taste remarkably the same. Everything is too salty. The steak is about one-third fat. I look around the room. The mostly redneck clientele is wolfing the stuff down, oblivious to the artery-clogging, trans-fatty nature of the the fare.

I am seated facing a window, looking out on the parking lot. A hunky, tricked-out, Chevy Silverado pulls into a handicapped spot right in front of the window. The driver pays no attention to the lines, parking at an awkward angle. He makes no attempt to correct it. An elderly woman climbs down from the passenger seat, stepping gingerly on the black rubber treads on the chrome exhaust pipes that run the length of the truck. I can't see the driver until he hobbles by the window. He is a skinny little cowpuncher in his nineties. They come inside. A few minutes later, a young dude comes along and eyeballs the pickup like it's been the ride of his dreams for his entire life.

I head for the dessert bar and return with blueberry pie and apple cobbler. I survey the room one last time before we leave. The diners, if I can use that word, are mostly overweight and unkempt. I catch my reflection in the window glass. I haven't shaved in five days and haven't had a haircut in months, maybe a year. I wonder what has happened to me. I look like I fit right in. What is this place, a chuck house for the intelligentsia..?

-vh

Really Big Band Concert, Wednesday

More than just a community band; more than just a school band; more than just an alumni band... The annual joint Community Band/YSHS-McKinney/Alumni Band Concert will be presented on Wednesday, Feb. 29 at 7:00 p.m. in the high school gym. We usually have a total of about 100 participants every year.

Come see your kids and neighbors make music together.

Saturday, February 25, 2012

Protecting the natural treasures of Ohio

Nancy Stranahan, director of the Arc of Appalachia, Mar. 9

Many of us have experienced the natural beauty that is Glen Helen. We’ve walked the trails and experienced first hand the wonders of the wilderness in our own back yard. Do most of us know however, what’s being done to protect the Glen and other amazing natural spaces in Ohio? Do we know what we can do to help keep these spaces growing wild and wonderful for future generations?

On March 9, 2012, we invite you to join the Tecumseh Land Trust (TLT) and the Glen Helen Ecological Institute for an evening with Nancy Stranahan, director of the Arc of Appalachia, as she discusses her successful work to protect wild spaces in Southeast Ohio. To date Ms. Stranahan’s organization has protected 5,000 acres of land in key botanical “hotspots”. Together we hope to build on their successes so that we can preserve Glen Helen permanently as one of the Miami Valley’s most precious natural treasures.

Our evening with Nancy Stranahan will run from 7:00 to 9:00pm. She will be speaking about the latest information on her nonprofit organization’s work done and providing a slideshow of some of the lands they have been able to preserve. We will meet at the Glen Helen Building, located at 405 Corry St. in Yellow Springs, OH. This event is free and open to the public.

The Tecumseh Land Trust is a local nonprofit organization that has preserved nearly 22,000 acres of agricultural and natural land in Clark and Greene Counties over the last two decades. The land trust also works to educate the public about land preservation options and the ways in which they can directly purchase food from local farmers. Direct sales of fresh food, or of value added products made from local crops, increase farm income and stimulate the local economy.

For more information please visit www.tecumsehlandtrust.org, www.antiochcollege.org/glenhelen, www.arcofappalachia.org, or call the Tecumseh Land Trust at 937.767.9490.

Friday, February 24, 2012

Destination Yellow Springs


February 24 Weekend & Beyond

Arts & Culture

Chamber Music Yellow Springs 314 Xenia Ave.
Jonannes Quartet; 2/26, 7:30p; $20 tickets at door

Yellow Springs Banner Festival Xenia, Corry & Dayton St.
See the beautiful banners around town all made by local artists.

YS Arts Council Permanent Collection 100 Dayton St.
2nd Floor of the John Bryan Community Center

Emporium Wines 233 Xenia Ave.
The work of photographer Kevin Miyazaki, through 2/29

Glen Helen Atrium Gallery 405 Corry St.
Members Exhibit, through 2/28

Glen House Art 1221 Glen Rd.
The African Sculpture Collection of Glen Owen; 2/26-4/11

Village Artisans 100 Corry St.
"Mysteries of the Heart" exhibit in the lobby through 2/24

Nature & Recreation

Glen Helen Nature Preserve 405 Corry St.
Macro Photography Workshop with Vince Nobel
2/25, 8:30a-4p; Glen Building Auditorium; $
Winter Birding; 2/26 9-11a; Grinnell Mill

Upcoming Events

Women's Voices Out Loud Gallery Show 100 Dayton St.
Pieces by local women; 3/1-3/31, 9a-5p

Sugar Shack Open House 100 Fairfield Pike
An Afternoon of Maple Sugaring at Flying Mouse Farm; 3/5, 2-5p; a TLT event.

Protecting Land, Protecting Glen Helen 405 Corry St.
Nancy Stranahan discusses land preservation; 3/9, 7-9p; a TLT event.

Women's Voices Out Loud 100 Dayton St.
An evening of Performances; 3/17, 7p

Antioch College Herndon Gallery
Harlem Quartet Performance; 3/17, 7:30p

Chamber Music Yellow Springs 314 Xenia Ave.
Harlem Quartet Performance; 3/18, 7:30p

Entertainment

Peach's Grill
104 Xenia Ave.
Food, Drink & Fun
Open Daily, 11:30-2:30a
Music Starts at 10 ($5 Cover)
Friday, Pharoah Loosey
Saturday, Achilles Heel &
Love or Drugs

___________________

Emporium Wines
233 Xenia Ave.
Wine Tasting/Live Music
Every Friday at 6:30p
Feb. 24 - Jerry Greene & Bluzion

___________________

Little Art Theatre
247 Xenia Ave.
Hugo,
A Martin Scorcese film

Oscar Party
February 26, 6p
reservations required

Thursday, February 23, 2012

Libby Rudolf showing at the Winds

Libby Rudolf will have work up at the Winds Cafe for the month of March (March 6 - April 1), showing recent work with a painting friend, Jennifer O'Brien. We will have an Artist's Reception on Sunday, March 11, 4:30-6:30pm. Please join us!

Take the A Train

Harlem Quartet to perform at Antioch College

Antioch College, in conjunction with Chamber Music Yellow Springs (CMYS), will present the Harlem String Quartet at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, March 17, in the Herndon Gallery in South Hall on the College’s campus. Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for students. Faculty, staff, and students with Antioch College ID cards receive free admission. James Johnston, former professor of music at Antioch College, will serve as the guest host for the performance.

The concert will present a rare opportunity to hear new works for string quartet by African-American composers, along with well-known traditional repertoire. The program will open with the String Quartet No. 1 by jazz giant Winton Marsalis; subtitled “The Octoroon Balls,” the work vividly evokes social life in segregated New Orleans a century ago. The Harlem Quartet will also premier a new work by Yellow Springs native Allen McCullough, written in memory of his late mother, Sarah McCullough. Following Franz Schubert’s immortal “Death and the Maiden” quartet, the concert will conclude with an arrangement of Take the A Train by Billy Strayhorn, the principal arranger of and musical powerhouse behind the Duke Ellington Band.

Praised for its "panache" by The New York Times, the Harlem Quartet is currently the resident ensemble in the New England Conservatory of Music's Professional String Quartet Program. Its mission is to advance diversity in classical music while engaging young and new audiences through the discovery and presentation of varied repertoire, highlighting works by minority composers.

Having made its Carnegie Hall debut in the fall of 2006, the Harlem Quartet has since performed for President Obama at the White House and has been featured on WNBC, CNN, The Today Show, WQXR-FM and the News Hour with Jim Lehrer. Each member of the quartet is a seasoned solo artist, having appeared with such orchestras as the New York Philharmonic, the Boston Pops, and the Atlanta, Baltimore, Cleveland, Detroit, National, New World, and Pittsburgh symphony orchestras.

For more information, contact Dennie Eagleson, creative director for the Herndon Gallery, at 937-768-6462 or deagleson@antiochcollege.org.

Wednesday, February 22, 2012

Tecumseh Land Trust Event, Mar. 4

Meet us at the Sugar Shack for an exciting afternoon exploring year round local farming

Have you ever wondered just how maple syrup gets from the tree to your pancakes? Are you curious about local farmers growing veggies year round? If you are, get your boots on, grab the family and head out to Flying Mouse Farms on Sunday March 4 from 2-5:00pm.

The Tecumseh Land Trust (TLT) members and friends will be joining local farmers Michele Burns and John DeWine as they open Flying Mouse Farms for their 3rd annual sugar shack open house. Learn about the entire process of how sap becomes syrup and check out a year round vegetable operation. Come with questions and maybe even take home some of their homemade sweetness for yourselves. This promises to be a fun and educational afternoon for the whole family to enjoy.

By exploring local foods, TLT and other local partners hope to learn about alternative food and farming operations that can make agriculture an even bigger part of the local economy in Southwest Ohio. The Tecumseh Land Trust is a local nonprofit organization that has preserved nearly 22,000 acres of agricultural land in Clark and Greene counties over two decades. The land trust also works to educate the public about land preservation options and the ways in which they can directly purchase food from local farmers. Direct sales of fresh food, or of value added products made from local crops, increase farm income and stimulate the local economy.

The Sugar Shack open house is located at Flying Mouse Farms, 100 E. Fairfield Pk., Yellow Springs, OH. For more information visit www.tecumsehlandtrust.org/calendar_of_events.htm.

Scene Around Town: Extreme Recycling

McGregor Hall, Antioch College

Tuesday, February 21, 2012

Wittenberg Symphonic Band

presents

“A Brief History of the Wind Band”

Featuring music by Gabrieli, Susato, Beethoven, Hewitt, Schmitt, and Fučik

Brandon Jones, conductor

Friday, February 24, 2012

7:30 p.m., Weaver Chapel

Please visit the music department website, http://www5.wittenberg.edu/academics/music.html for a complete list of up-coming music department events!


Admission is free, and the concert is open to the public!

Save this date: Saturday, Mar. 17

Women’s Voices Out Loud

Join us, on Saturday, March 17, 7 p.m., at the John Bryan Center, Yellow Springs, for the 33rd Annual Women’s Voices Out Loud: a celebration of women’s experiences! Visual art pieces will hang in the Bryan Center Gallery, from March 1-31 and can be viewed, anytime..

Women and girls, of any age or experience, are invited to share their spoken word, poetry, music, song, dance or a combination of the above either singly or with other women/girls. Each piece is considered a gift to the community and those who participate as audience are extremely supportive and appreciative.

Some of the ways people can support the experience include: setting up and putting away chairs; bringing finger food; setting up the food in the kitchen area, and cleaning up afterwards; helping to hang and display the visual arts part; and passing the word along to the women and girls you know.

Anyone, who would like to participate, should bring a finished piece, to be performed in 4 minutes or less (a little more for a group piece), to the rehearsal, on Sunday, March 11, 6:30 p.m., in the Yellow Springs Senior Center. Deadline for submitting visual art pieces is March 1 (call Liz Hale).

This is always a magical, unpredictable evening celebrating the experiences and expressions of women and girls in our area.

For more information, or to participate, contact Liz Hale at 937.532.4803 or halewolfe4@aol.com. This is a FREE community event.

Please share this information with anyone, that you feel might be interested.

Saturday night at Clifton Opera House

Ralph Kettering and the Impossibles will play the Clifton Opera House on Saturday, February 25th. The show starts at 7:30pm, box office opens at 6:30pm. The historic Opera House is looking forward to the return of this band. This group of talented musicians have become one of the Opera House staples playing every spring and fall. Ralph and the band will have your toes tapping with old time favorites featuring big band, 40's, polkas, and country. They truly give a big band event. The Clifton Opera House is owned and operated by the Village of Clifton and is a fund raiser. Call 937.767.2343 for more information or www.cliftonoperahouse.com.

Monday, February 20, 2012

Bench to Nowhere: Local Links

A Cool Town Toon

Help for the homeless in Greene County

Are you homeless, or about to become homeless?

Learn what resources are available in Greene County!

Community Action Partnership now has walk-in hours, for homeless or about to become homeless individuals and families.

Come in and discuss your situation with the Central Intake Specialist to determine the best course of action.

Place: Community Action Partnership, 1855 Bellbrook Rd., Xenia

Days: Tuesdays and Thursdays

Times: Must sign in between 1:00 and 3:00, first come, first serve basis

You can also come in anytime during business hours (M-F 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.) and complete a pre-application for emergency shelter for families, or transitional housing for single individuals.

You must come in to fill out the pre-application.

Sculptor to speak at Antioch, Wednesday

Linda Stein to present lecture on gender at Antioch College

Sculptor, artist and activist Linda Stein will present a lecture titled “Salander/Blomkvist: Challenging Stereotypes in The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo – and beyond” at 8 p.m. Wednesday, February 22, in McGregor Hall Room 113 on the Antioch College campus.

The lecture, first performed at the Brooklyn Museum in October 2011, includes a screening of a condensed version of the movie, The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, and an examination of gender reversal and gender scrambling executed in the film. Stein will discuss the popular appeal of the character Salander as a protector and heroic icon. The lecture is free and open to the public.

For more information about Stein’s lecture at Antioch College, contact Dennie Eagleson at 937-768-6462 or deagleson@antiochcollege.org.

Stein’s art and activism have been passionately engaged toward tearing down all forms of gender stereotypes and prejudices as she increasingly focuses on celebrating the fluidity of gender. Art historians Christina M. Penn-Goetsch, Margo Hobbs Thompson, and Ann Vollman Bible have written separately and extensively about how Stein continues to “break down boundaries between female, male, feminine and masculine,” doing so “with the clear intent of dismantling a hegemony that limits individuals and values one gender over another.” An articulate speaker for peace and equality, Stein critiques and denounces injustice and gender-based violence in our culture. She combats rigid and binary ways to allow for a more liberated, egalitarian, authentic and enlightened experience of gender identity.

Stein has been featured on more than 150 television, radio, magazine and online formats discussing the expanding definition of gender and describing how her art informs this changing view. Through 2014, Stein’s sculptures will travel to more than 19 museums and universities around the country, including a stop at the Burnell R. Roberts Triangle Gallery at Sinclair Community College from February 2 to March 7 in Dayton.

Sunday, February 19, 2012

Back Story: The loss of a neighbor

I learned just last night of the passing of Hugh Livingston this past Tuesday. Huey was our next door neighbor - and he was a good one. Huey was there to greet us the day we moved into our house on Allen Street ten years ago. He was a well-known fixture in town and was still serving as the crossing guard at Mills Lawn School, after having retired from the YSPD.

Back in those days, the school bus used to stop in front of his house and the kids would wait in his driveway. One morning, shortly after we moved in, Huey returned from Mills Lawn to find our son standing in his driveway. He had missed the bus. So Huey drove him to school. That was the start of a quirky relationship that lasted until Huey got sick last year and we didn't see him out-and-about anymore. Huey thought Kalson was a character. The feeling was mutual. He once gave Kalson an old set of electric trains that had been gathering dust in his house. Sometimes, when the hens were producing more than we could consume, we would send Kalson over with a dozen eggs, knowing Huey would appreciate the visit even more than the eggs.

Huey was a great kibitzer. He loved to play sidewalk superintendent for any project that might be going on in our front yard. Often guys doing work for us had grown up in town and remembered when Huey was on the force. More than one of them told me that they'd had run-ins with him when they were younger and that he had always treated the situation with reason and compassion, i.e. they were sent home with a warning not to do it again.

"The world could use more cops like Hugh Livingston," one of them once told me.

The world could use more neighbors like Hugh Livingston. He will be missed.

-vh

Scholarship offer mix-up

Two Antiochs in one small town




The Xenia Daily Gazette reported last week that Antioch College's free tuition offer for the next three classes has increased inquiries by ten-fold at Antioch University Midwest.

Xenia Daily Gazette: Scholarships create confusion over 2 Antiochs

Saturday, February 18, 2012

The Oscars, Yellow Springs Style

Celebrate the Oscars at the Little Art Theatre
“Jeans ’n’ Jammies” - Feb.26

The Little Art Theatre in Yellow Springs will once again celebrate the Oscars with “Jeans ’n’ Jammies: The Oscars at the Little Art” on Sunday, Feb. 26. Plans call for the screening of the Awards Ceremony during which a cash bar will be available serving Little Artinis (custom created for the event by Shane Creepingbear of the Sunrise Café) at $7.00 a glass and wine for $5.00 a glass. The Oscars at the Little Art will be preceded at 6:00 p.m. by a pre-party at the Winds Café, just a short walk from the theater, where heavy appetizers and complimentary wine will be served thanks to Mary Kay Smith and Kim Korkan of the Winds Café. At 7:30 p.m. partygoers will proceed to the red carpet at the Little Art in time to catch the Oscars on the big screen – served up with free popcorn. For those who wish to go early, the Hollywood red carpet arrivals will be showing at the Little Art at 7:00 p.m.

Admission to the entire program is $50, of which $35 is a tax deductible contribution to the nonprofit Little Art Theatre Association. Attendees are invited to come in their pajamas. But, if they are not comfortable with relaxed attire in public, they may opt for jeans. Prizes will be awarded for best Jammies for couple and individual, for correctly predicting winners in the major categories, and for winners of a movie trivia contest. Local actor Howard Shook will emcee the event.

The deadline for reservations is Feb. 22. Seating is limited to 150, so early reservations are recommended. They can be made online by clicking here, or by mailing a check to the Little Art Theatre, 247 Xenia Avenue, Yellow Springs, OH 45387, with names of guests and an e-mail address.

For more information about the event or how to purchase tickets, check the Little Art Website, www.littleart.com, or call Maureen Lynch at 937.901.1920.

Friday, February 17, 2012

Dewine endorses Santorum




Former Yellow Springer and U.S. Senator, Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine has switched his support in the Republican Presidential Primary from Mitt Romney to Rick Santorum, the media is widely reporting today.

Bloomberg: Santorum Gets Ohio Attorney General DeWine to Switch Support From Romney

CBS News: DeWine backs Santorum, withdraws Romney endorsement

Chicago Tribune: Ohio's Mike DeWine: 'I was wrong' to back Romney over Santorum

Artist to speak at Antioch

Zachary Cahill to present talk and workshop at Antioch College

Antioch College will present The Orphanage Project 2012, a multimedia exhibition by artist Zachary Cahill, from March 2 through May 18 in Herndon Gallery, South Hall. Gallery hours are 1:00 to 4:00 p.m.

An opening reception with artist talk begins at 6 p.m. Friday, March 2, and an artist workshop follows from 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. on Saturday, March 3.

The Orphanage Project 2012 includes drawings, sculptures, and installation. Through the mythic figure of the orphan and symbolism of the bear, Cahill meditates on the role of the artist and the citizen as they struggle to find their place within the demands of the capitalist market and the contemporary political landscape.

In a 2010 interview in Chicago, Cahill claims that the basic idea of his art project is to use orphans as a means to stage a polemic against human capital. “There are other figures I look to, of course, but the orphan strikes me as peculiar and exceptional,” he explains. “Occupying the central role in the popular imagination, the orphan becomes a cipher for collective desire and aspiration and is thus a vehicle par excellence for ideology.”

Cahill is an interdisciplinary artist whose work has been exhibited at the Center for Art and Media Technology in Karlsruhe, Germany (ZKM); Aarhus Kunstbygning in Aarhus, Denmark; DeVos Museum of Art, Marquette, MI; and threewalls, Chicago, amongst other. His writings have appeared in the Journal of Visual Culture, RETHINKING MARXISM, Proximity Magazine, and Artforum.com. Currently, Cahill is a lecturer in the department of visual arts at the University of Chicago.

For more information, or to reserve a seat for the artist workshop, contact Dennie Eagleson, creative director for the Herndon Gallery, at deagleson@antiochcollege.org or 937-768-6462.

Thursday, February 16, 2012

Destination Yellow Springs

Click here for info.

A public farewell

Goodbye to Village Manager Mark Cundiff

Please Join Council and Village Employees!

Open House Thursday February 16, 4:30-6 on the second floor of the Bryan Center.

Share snacks and beverages, and join us in wishing Mark Cundiff farewell.

Wednesday, February 15, 2012

Free CPR training at MTFR

Miami Township Fire-Rescue will be holding an American Heart Association HeartSaver CPR/AED course at the fire station on Thursday, February 23rd. This course is designed for the general public and teaches adult & child CPR as well as the use of an AED. For more information or to register visit www.mtfr.org/aha_courses.html.

This is a fantastic opportunity to learn a lifesaving skill that can really make a difference!

Updated: Lend A Hand At WYSO

Update: The positions have been filled.

WYSO is looking for five people who can donate two hours of their time on Monday, February 20th from 10:00 AM to Noon.

It's time to send out membership renewals and we need envelope-stuffers. If you're available, email Sarah Buckingham at sbuckingham@wyso.com.

Thanks for supporting your local public radio station!

Annual big, big band concert, Feb. 29

The annual joint Community Band/YSHS-McKinney/Alumni Band Concert will be presented on Wednesday, Feb. 29 at 7:00 p.m. in the high school gym. We usually have a total of about 100 participants every year.

Come see your kids and neighbors make music together.

Tuesday, February 14, 2012

Library Guest Speaker: Robert Harris

Thursday February 16, 6:30 p.m.

Robert Harris will speak about the African American Genealogy Group of the Miami Valley, its history and value as a community resource.

Free Demo, Saturday

Click on image to enlarge.

Arts Council Reception

You are invited to a Celebration!

This year the YSAC Permanent Collection is 20 years old. And it’s still growing as new generations of artists and collectors gift the people of Yellow Springs with their art.

Just in the last month Sherraid Scott, Pam Geisel, Anna Arbor and Michael Fleishman have generously donated to the collection.

The collection has been hung at the John Bryan Community Gallery. It will remain up, (except for breaks when the gallery is scheduled for other groups) for the next 2 years.

We are having a reception on February 17th from 5-8 p.m. at The John Bryan Community Gallery.

Refreshments will be served in rooms A&B

At 7:30 p.m. Anna Arbor will be leading a Gallery Walk. She will be talking about the history of the collection and sharing some of the artists’ stories.

Ben Hemmendinger, a wonderful street musician who plays an improvisational blend of Eastern European and Irish music, will be providing live music.

There will also be some storyboards with old reviews, flyers postcards and pictures on display from some of the John Bryan Community Gallery shows from the 90’s.

We would love to have you join us in celebrating this legacy from Yellow Springs Artists.

Monday, February 13, 2012

Rocky & Pee Wee: Some folks are never happy

Click on image to enlarge.

Saturday night at Clifton Opera House

On Saturday February 18th, the James and Moore group will return to Clifton entertaining you with old standards. Lou James and Pamela Moore make up the dynamic duo.

Lou James has been in the music business for many years. His first major job was traveling with Dick Clark's bands "The Cavalcade Of Stars" & "The Caravan Of Stars". He is also a member of "The Impossibles" and "The Ivory Doghouse".

Pamela is new to the business, but not new to singing. She has performed at many functions over the years, but just four years ago started to live out her dream to be a "Singer". She has a love for the music of the 30's and 40's, the Billie Holiday, Etta James, Ella Fitzgerald tunes. Especially the songs that tell the stories of life.

The show starts at 7:30pm, box office opens at 6:30pm. The Clifton Opera House is located at 5 So. Clay Street, Clifton. Call 937-767-2343 for more information or visit our website at www.villageofclifton.com.

Sunday, February 12, 2012

Glen Helen Atrium Gallery Exhibition, Mar. 3

Birdsong Hill: low-relief wood images by Russ Shaw
March 3 – April 29, 2012

Glen Helen Atrium Gallery is showing “Birdsong Hill: low-relief wood images” by Russ Shaw from March 3 – April 29, 2012. Shaw creates three-dimensional natural scenes from maple, poplar, red cedar, walnut, birch, elm, Osage orange and other wood native to Ohio.

Shaw grew up and now lives on the family farm in Yellow Springs. Sometimes the idea for a piece “picks me as I gaze across the fields and woods where I live. A great blue heron. A cardinal. I think about the kinds of wood I will use in terms of color, tone and grain.” Shaw then sketches the setting and plans the combinations of woods that will contrast and compliment the subject. The public is invited to meet the artist at the opening reception on Sunday, March 4 from 2 - 4 pm.

The Gallery is located in the Glen Helen Building at 405 Corry Street in Yellow Springs. Show hours are 9:30 am to 4:30 pm Monday through Friday and 10 am to 4 pm on Saturdays and Sundays. Admission is free. Artwork will be available for purchase with proceeds supporting the Glen Helen Nature Preserve.

For more information call the Glen Helen Ecology Institute at 937.769.1902 or visit www.glenhelen.org.

The Glen Helen Atrium Gallery showcases the work of emerging local and regional visual artists in six exhibits each year. A portion of the proceeds from the sale of art goes to the Glen Helen Association, a non-profit organization whose mission is to support preservation and programs at Glen Helen and its 1,000-acre nature preserve.

Saturday, February 11, 2012

Dance instruction at YSKP

New Series of Ballroom Dancing at Yellow Springs Kids Playhouse begins on February 13

Renown and very funny Ballroom Dance teach Mario Krazweski will hold a 6 week series of Ballroom Dancing lessons at YSKP beginning on Monday, February 13th from 7-8 at The Playhouse, 910 Corry St. next to the Antioch College Amphitheater. Cost is $90/person. Info yskp.org or 767-7800

Mario Kraszewski is a former owner & operator of the Dayton Arthur Murray Dance Studio’s .

After numerous championships throughout Europe, Mario came to the U.S. in 1998 and worked briefly in New York before joining the Dayton Arthur Murray Staff. He then rose to great heights winning the World Arthur Murray Rising Star Smooth Championship in 2003. He has also performed with the Cincinnati Pops and Symphony Orchestras. Mario is commentator of Dancing with the Stars for local Fox TV station. He has been working with them since season 1.

Mario is originally from Warsaw, Poland where as a young teenager he began his ballroom dancing career competing in International Style Standard and Latin. During this time he won several Mario holds titles in both the Latin and Standard divisions. He also taught and competed in wheelchair ballroom, in which he would lead paraplegics in specially made wheelchairs. In 1995 he established the first Wheelchair Dance Federation in Poland and became its first vice president. In 1996, he won the Wheelchair Ballroom World Cup in Holland with his partner.

Mario teaches students and professionals in all five styles – Latin, Ballroom, Rhythm, Smooth, Theater Art.

Course description: Mario’s Ballroom Dance Class will include basic elements to the most popular social dances, including: SWING, SALSA, RUMBA, and MERENGUE.

Friday, February 10, 2012

A public farewell

Please Join Council and Village Employees!

Open House Thursday February 16, 4:30-6 on the second floor of the Bryan Center.

Share snacks and beverages, and join us in wishing Mark Cundiff farewell.

Destination Yellow Springs

Click on image to enlarge.

Arts & Culture

A Yellow Springs Banner Festival Show Senior Center
Meet the artists, learn about their inspiration; Sun, Feb. 12, 1-3p

Antioch College Herndon Gallery One Morgan Place
"Nikki McClure: Cutting Her Own Path" Tu-Sa, 1-4p through 2/15

Emporium Wines 233 Xenia
The Work of Photographer Kevin Miyazaki; through February 29

Glen Helen Atrium Gallery 405 Corry St.
Members Exhibit - January 27 through February 28
Mo-Fr 9:30a-4:30p, Sa-Su 10a-4p

Glen House Art 1221 Glen Rd.
Paintings of Patricia Cole 1/29-2/19; Gallery Hours Su 2-4p

Springs Gallery in Kings Yard
"Flora & Fauna - Works of James & Christine Klinger" thru 2/16
Open Friday - Sunday 12-7p

Village Artisans 100 Corry St.
"Mysteries of the Heart" exhibit in lobby through Feb. 24
Artist Reception, Friday, Feb. 10, 6-9p


Nature & Recreation

Glen Helen Nature Preserve 405 Corry St.
First Spring Flower Hike, Sun. Feb. 12, 4p, Jacoby Rd. Entrance

Entertainment

Peach's Grill
104 Xenia Ave.
Food, Drink & Fun
Open Daily, 11:30-2:30a
Music Starts at 10 ($5 Cover)
Friday, Animal Grace Saturday, Seefari
Special Love-in Event
60's & 70's Dance Music
Friday, 5-7p

___________________

Emporium Wines
233 Xenia Ave.
Wine Tasting/Live Music
Every Friday at 6:30p
Feb. 10- The Hoppers (RockNRoll)
Feb. 11 (1-5p)- Choc. Wine Tasting
Feb. 12 (1p)-Status of Same Sex Marriage by Ed Mullin

___________________

Little Art Theatre
247 Xenia Ave.
War Horse
Boldly emotional.

Growing Up Female
A documentary
Sun, Feb. 12, 4p
Free, donations welcome

Flood of applicants has Antioch hopping

2,400 applications and counting




The free tuition offer at Antioch College has resulted in thousands of applications, WDTN-TV (Channel 2) is reporting. So far the school has received 2,400 applications for 75 spots.

A couple weeks ago, the Blog was the first to report that the college's website had gone down due to an overload of inquiries. Recently, the college has put out a call to the community for volunteers to help handle the flood of correspondence generated by their offer.

WDTN-TV: Thousands try for free tuition offer

Related post: Victim of its own success

Thursday, February 9, 2012

Artist's Reception, Feb.12

Click on image to enlarge.

Antioch School celebrates 90th Anniversary

“Saturday Night with Julia Sweeney”
March 24

Famed comedian Julia Sweeney will visit Yellow Springs for a special performance honoring the 90th anniversary of the Antioch School of Yellow Springs, one of the nation’s oldest independent elementary schools.

Sweeney, who for many years played “Pat” on the legendary television show Saturday Night Live, will star in “Saturday Night With Julia Sweeney,” part of the Antioch School’s annual Auction Gala event. It will be held March 24, 6 p.m. at Antioch University Midwest. In addition to the program by Sweeney, the event will offer a silent auction, a live auction, a raffle, and dinner with wine.

The Auction Gala event hopes to raise $25,000 for the Antioch School, an essential Yellow Springs institution highly regarded as a progressive, child-centered school emphasizing the educational benefits of creative play, individualized instruction and student self-responsibility. The school's five learning programs include nursery, kindergarten, younger group (grades 1-3), older group (grades 4-6), and art and science (for all students). Visitors are welcome.

Julia Sweeney is currently widely known for her one-woman shows performed coast-to-coast and acclaimed for tackling controversial subjects — such as mortality, family life, faith, and others — with love and laughter. She is also author of the memoir “God Said, HA!,” is currently writing a book on parents and parenting, tentatively titled, “If It’s Not One Thing, It’s Your Mother,” and has been featured many times on NPR with Ira Glass and This American Life.

Liz Griffin, a parent of two Antioch School students, said “Julia is the perfect performer for our Auction Gala, able to tell the truth on difficult topics in intelligent and very funny ways.” She and Kipra Heermann, grandmother of an Antioch School student, recently attended a performance by Sweeney in Chicago, met her afterwards and invited her to perform in Yellow Springs.

Admission to the Auction Gala will be $50 per person. The Meadowlark Restaurant will provide a one-course dinner, and wine is complimentary. The live and silent auctions will feature donated items ranging from useful to beautiful to unique. The raffle winner will win four airplane tickets to anywhere in the continental U.S.

In honor of the Antioch School’s 90th anniversary, the Morgan Family Foundation of Yellow Springs has pledged a matching gift of up to $50,000 for every dollar donated to the School the night of the event.

To reserve seats and/or buy raffle tickets, please contact Antioch School Manager M.J. Richlen at 937-767-7642. Seating is limited to 250.

The Antioch School is grateful to an Anonymous Donor who has made the event possible and to these sponsors of the event: Jim Stuart; Adoption Link; Pat Dell; Springfield Urology; Star Pediatrics; Wagner Subaru; A-C Service Co., Inc.; Arthur Morgan House Bed & Breakfast; Bob Baldwin, Laurel Finch, LMT, LLC; Dave and Diane Foubert; Griffin Carpentry and Renovation; GymQuest Sports Academy; Houser Asphalt; Abi Katz- Stein; Linda McNelly, STOP Human Trafficking Dayton; New Liberty Farms; Charles Swaney, Attorney; Tom’s Market; WesBanco Xenia Shoe and Leather Repair, and Yellow Springs Chiropractic.

Go to http://vimeo.com/31657410 to see The Antioch School 90th Anniversary Video.

Wednesday, February 8, 2012

Local author has new book

S.J. Drum writing as Clara Laveaux

A LIFE BEYOND YESTERDAY follows Amelia’s journey as she reinvents herself while adapting to single motherhood and discovers an ability to love she thought had died with her husband.

After remaining shrouded in grief and depression for nearly a year following the unexpected death of Amelia Gauge’s young husband, Amelia realizes she must extract herself from this dark emotional vortex for the sake of her son.

Because the home she’d shared with her deceased husband is mired in memories too painful to face each day, Amelia moves with her son across the country from rural Ohio to Venice Beach, California for a fresh start.

A LIFE BEYOND YESTERDAY explores the guilt of a former stay-at-home mother forced to concentrate on herself and what she wants out of life while navigating a new-to-her world filled with deceit and hidden danger, a movie star suitor, big money and even bigger hearts.

ALBY can be found at Amazon in e-book format and should be available at Barnes and Noble in the next day or so. The paperback will be released in about a week from both Amazon and Barnes and Noble.


About the author:

S.J. Drum, writes Urban Fantasy/Paranormal Romance Novels. Under the pen name Clara LaVeaux, she writes Contemporary Women's Fiction with strong romantic elements. She currently live near Yellow Springs, Ohio with her husband and two small children.
www.sj-drum.com

Saturday night at Clifton Opera House

North River Band

Get your boots ready for scootin', the North River Band is coming back to the Clifton Opera House on Saturday, Feb 11! How to describe them? "Old country style" with an occasional bluegrassy, rockabilly, or old rock and roll tune thrown in to keep your toes tapping.

Clifton's own Michael Smith has been playing acoustic music since the '80's. His early days were filled with bluegrass and country with his "Honeycreek Bluegrass Band". These days his influences include Johnny Cash, Ian Tyson, John Prine, Doc Watson, Tom Russell, and Stevie Ray Vaughan, and he'll still do some bluegrass if requested, just ask!

The North River Band was formed in 2009's for the Old Clifton Days' festival. Michael's backed up by Dan Meyers on the bass, Robert Conoway on rhythm guitar and vocals, and Susan Meyer Heeg on the violin. This talented bunch of musicians will have you rockin'! Check their website for their performance schedule. www.northriverband.com. The Clifton Opera House is located at 5 So. Clay Street, Clifton. The Box office opens at 6:30pm, concert at 7:30pm. Door donation $7.00 Contact 937.767.2343 for more information or visit the website www.villageofclifton.com.

Tuesday, February 7, 2012

Back Story: Staying close

Sometimes I have to face the truth; I am a shit. I am repeatedly forced to confront that reality, because every now-and-then it comes back and hits me over the head. Like today... the news in my email that I just lost a cousin who was born only four days before I was. We played together when we were kids. We were close into our teens, then drifted apart.

I can't remember exactly when the last time I saw him was. It was at a wedding, but I can't remember whose. If I guessed it was over thirty years ago, I probably wouldn't be far off. Let's just say it was half-a-lifetime ago. In this case, it was probably as much his fault as mine. But, I still blame myself. I am lazy about maintaining relationships.

We Hervey's are an odd bunch. We can go for years without talking. Our history is punctuated with family spats. Maybe we're overly sensitive; maybe we're insecure. I recently reconnected with an uncle with whom I'd been close as a kid. Again, it must have been more than thirty years. Ironically, we had been talking about my cousin - what a good kid he was.

But my laxness in maintaining relationships goes beyond family. I keep reading the obituaries of college friends I haven't talked to in years. In one case I was the godfather of one of my friend's children. Another half-a-lifetime...

The feeling, of course, is regret. It's too late to reconnect. It's all water under the bridge, and now, what was once a trickle has become a river. That's life. That's my life. Perhaps it's time for a late New Year's resolution. I could make a list of rules for living out the rest of my life, but I know I'd only break them. As a trial lawyer there were rules like "never ask a question to which you don't already know the answer." As a writer there were rules like "show, don't tell." Any good lawyer or writer would tell you that these rules are there so that if you are going to break one, you should have a good reason. Believe me, I can always come up with something. But here it is anyway:

Uncle Gunch's rules for living, age 65 and above:
  1. Communicate with at least one member of your extended family every week.
  2. Stay in touch with old friends by some other means than Facebook.
  3. If you are traveling within 20-30 miles of an old friend or relative, stop and visit.
  4. If you are mad at someone, don't let it go on for too long. Find a reason to break the ice.
  5. Remember that you are not always right.
  6. Tell your immediate family members that you love them, every day.
  7. Love your dog, but not to the exclusion of others.
  8. Take your vitamins.
  9. Maintain a low dose aspirin regimen.
  10. Avoid doctors and hospitals.
  11. Avoid incurring monthly expenses for crap you don't need.
  12. Don't smoke.
  13. Don't use a cell phone while driving.
  14. Look both ways before crossing the street.
  15. Be careful where you step. If you fall down, it's all over. (See #10.)
  16. Get someone younger to do your heavy lifting.
  17. Exercise within reasonable limits.
  18. Take a nap every afternoon.
  19. Eat balanced meals in small portions.
  20. Limit your intake of salt and sugar, but not completely, because these are two things that truly enhance life.
  21. Have a martini every night before dinner.
  22. Don't drink before 5 p.m.
  23. Avoid stress. (This might require you to ignore 1-5 and possibly 22.)

-vh

Second Sunday Free Writers' Workshop

Antioch Writers' Workshops Review, Feb. 12

The Antioch Writers' Workshop and Books & Co are offering the next Second Sunday Free Writers' Workshop on February 12, 2:00-3:30 p.m. at Books & Co at The Greene. Select Antioch Writers' Workshop staff, faculty, and trustees will be on hand to give a preview of the upcoming Genre Saturday Seminar (March 31) and the 27th Annual Summer Workshop (July 7-13).

The free session will include information on the application process for a wide variety of scholarships that cover up to as much as the cost of attending. AWW staff, faculty and trustees will be prepared to answer questions about the workshops as well as provide information on the new B.A. in Literature and Creative Writing at Antioch University Midwest (an AWW partner).

"We're excited to get the word out about the excellent workshops we have coming up this year," said AWW director Sharon Short. "These workshops are ideal opportunities for writers at any stage in the process to work closely with accomplished professionals in the writing world."

Learn more about the Antioch Writers' Workshop and upcoming events at Books & Co at The Green on February 12 from 2:00 to 3:30 p.m.. No reservations are required for the Second Sunday Free Writers' Workshop, but expressed intention to attend is appreciated. Call Books & Co at The Greene at 937- 429-6302.

For more information about Antioch Writers' Workshop or the Second Sunday Free Writers' Workshop, visit our website or email info@antiochwritersworkshop.com.

Registration for both the Genre Saturday Seminar (March 31) and 27th Annual Summer Workshop (July 7-13) are now open at www.antiochwritersworkshop.com.

Antioch Writers' Workshop events are held in partnership with Antioch University Midwest and with support from the Yellow Springs Community Foundation; Ohio Arts Council; The Frank Pace, Jr. Foundation; and WYSO (media sponsor).

Monday, February 6, 2012

Banner Fest this Sunday

Yellow Springs Banner Festival 2012 participants are working hard all over town to complete their submissions before the due date of Sunday, February 12, when there will be a Banner Festival Show-and-Tell at the Senior Center, 227 Xenia Avenue, from 1-3 p.m. The public is invited to the “reveal” to see this year’s submissions up close and learn about the inspiration behind the designs from their creators before the banners are handed over to the Village crew to hang throughout downtown. Refreshments will be served. Interested future YS Banner Fest participants are encouraged to attend the Show-and-Tell to learn about the process and gather tips and inspiration from banner-making newbies and veterans.

For additional information and questions, please call Maxine Skuba, 760-7715; Susan Gartner, 767-2170; or Kit Merrill at 767-1524 or visit the “banner blog” at ysbannerfestival.wordpress.com.

Sunday, February 5, 2012

Bench to Nowhere: Pucker up!

A Smooch Town Toon

Yellow Springs target of petition for new law




Death of daughter prompts couple to seek law in YS

Frustrated by lack of state action on cell phone use while driving, a couple who lost their daughter in an automobile accident in Bethel Township, is going town-to-town to appeal to local governing bodies to pass such laws. Yellow Springs is to be the first as they will petition Village Council this Monday night, WDTN-TV is reporting.

WDTN-TV: Death of daughter prompts Lauren's Law

Saturday, February 4, 2012

WYSO needs volunteers

Calling all bartenders!

WYSO is looking for a dozen volunteers to pour wine at our silent auction fundraising event, coming up Saturday, February 11th at the Hollenbeck-Bayley Center in Springfield.

Volunteers receive up to two free tickets to the event. Arrive at 4:45 PM and spend an hour working at the bar, pouring tasty wine selections with an expert wine representative, and then enjoy the rest of the event. There are two shifts available: 6:00 to 7:00 PM, or 7:00 to 8:00 PM.

If you're interested in volunteering at the WYSO Silent Auction, call Sarah at 937-769-1334 or email sbuckingham@wyso.org.

Friday, February 3, 2012

Destination Yellow Springs


February 3 Weekend & Beyond

Enjoy this Weekend and the unseasonably warm weather
In the Springs

Shopping, Dining, Exploring

Nearly 100 shops, galleries & restaurants within 2 miles;
over 65 right in our wonderful, walk-able downtown.

Glen Helen with miles of lovely trails & the Yellow Spring.

The Little Miami Scenic Trail for safe & scenic bike rides.

Arts & Culture

Chamber Music Yellow Springs 314 Xenia Ave.
Minneapolis Guitar Quartet; Sun, Feb. 5, 7:30p

Antioch College Drawing Workshop YSKP Space
Artist-in-Residence Patricia Coles; Sun, Feb. 5, 2-5p

Antioch College Herndon Gallery One Morgan Place
"Nikki McClure: Cutting Her Own Path" Tu-Sa, 1-4p through 2/15

Glen Helen Atrium Gallery 405 Corry St.
Members Exhibit - January 27 through February 28
Mo-Fr 9:30a-4:30p, Sa-Su 10a-4p

Glen House Art 1221 Glen Rd.
Paintings of Patricia Cole 1/29-2/19; Gallery Hours Su 2-4p

Springs Gallery in Kings Yard
"Flora & Fauna - Works of James & Christine Klinger" thru 2/16
Open Friday - Sunday 12-7p

Village Artisans 100 Corry St.
"Mysteries of the Heart" exhibit in lobby through Feb. 24

Nature & Recreation

Glen Helen Nature Preserve 405 Corry St.
Winter Photography Hike, Sat. Feb. 4, 10a, Trailside Museum
Public Reptile Feeding, Sat. Feb. 4, 11a-12p, Trailside Museum

Entertainment

Peach's Grill
104 Xenia Ave.
Food, Drink & Fun
Open Daily, 11:30-2:30a
Music Starts at 10 ($5 Cover)
Friday, Black Owls
Saturday, Soul Rebels
___________________

Emporium Wines
233 Xenia Ave.
Wine Tasting/Live Music
Every Friday at 6:30p
Feb. 3- The Odyssey (Jazz)
___________________

Little Art Theatre
247 Xenia Ave.
The Artist
Held over.
Call of the Scenic River: An Ohio Journey
Sun, Feb. 5, 1p
$6 tickets

AFS Plea for Host Families

HOST AN AFS FOREIGN EXCHANGE STUDENT (AGE 15-18) NEXT SCHOOL YEAR

HOMES ESPECIALLY NEEDED FOR FAIRBORN AND YELLOW SPRINGS AREAS BUT OTHER DAYTON DISTRICTS TOO.

The Dayton Area AFS Council is looking for local families interested in sharing their home and American values and culture with a foreign exchange student. The 15 to 18-year old international students are carefully screened, fully insured and have studied English usually 4 to 8 years. They come from over 55 countries, including, Austria, Australia, Bolivia, Chile, Brazil, China, Czech Republic, Denmark, Ecuador, Finland, France, Germany, Ghana, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Russia, Spain, Sweden, Thailand, and many more.

They will arrive in August in time for the start of the school year and return to their homes at the end of the school year. Throughout their stay AFS volunteers from the Dayton area will plan special events, social gatherings, and orientations for the host family members and the AFS’er. Students are matched with hosts through in-home meetings with prospective families and AFS volunteers, and families may review student applications.

Our AFS students have been hosted by childless couples ,singles, “empty nesters,” and single parent families with great success and happiness in past years, so do not think that hosts are only the typical, nuclear families. Hosting an AFS’er of the opposite sex of your own child is encouraged if the family has the interest. Your child can have the “brother” or “sister” they never had! The important things are your “open heart” and desire to make a good home and hosting experience for a child who is coming to live for 10 months (August-June) in the U.S. experiencing American life and to share their own country’s language, history, and culture. The primary expense to the host is to provide food and to pay for the AFS’er when on outings with the family. The students have their own spending money.

Information about programs (and scholarships!) for American students to go study abroad with AFS is also available at the website: www.afs.org.

Usually 5-8 students from the Dayton area go abroad with AFS annually.
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For more information, contact Marla Gamble at 233-6190 (email: mjgceramic@aol.com) or see www.afs.org to do your research and to indicate your interest to be contacted about hosting.

Root cellars and recipes

Saturday, Feb 11
Basement Methodist Church

Root cellars and Root Recipe Contest

This workshop and food event is sponsored by New Liberty Farms.

Please bring your favorite root vegetable dish (as interpreted by you!). Amy Magnus, local foodie and Village Gravy blogger will judge entries. Winner of this root vegetable cook-off wins a New Liberty Farms gift certificate.

While you're here, learn about root cellars; traditonal and innovative ways to store winter root vegetables, whether you live on 100 acres or in an apartment.

Event is free but you must reigster by calling Beth at 768 7240.

Thursday, February 2, 2012

Wherefore art thou, Allen Street Al?

No groundhog news to report from the South End this year. Allen Street Al hasn't been seen since we got the dog. But judging from the weather, Al has probably seen his shadow somewhere in one of our neighbor's backyards. Too bad - six more weeks of winter...

Food for fines

Bring canned goods to Yellow Springs Library between February 19-25 and have one dollar of fines forgiven per can.

Canned goods cannot contribute toward fees incurred from lost or damaged items.

Wednesday, February 1, 2012

Saturday night at Clifton Opera House

Tim Gebard and Friends
Red Cross Fundraiser


On Saturday, February 4th, Tim Gebard will debut his new CD "Unbroken Hearts" at the Clifton Opera House. What makes this even more special is that it is a fund raiser for the American Red Cross. Tim's eclectic acoustic style includes folk-rock to country to blues. He will be joined by several friends on stage to make this evening even more special. Guitar genious Junior Smith is just one of many guest musicians. Tim is a local talent, growing up in Springfield.

Join us for this worthy cause. The show starts at 7:30pm, box office opens at 6:30pm. Door donation $10. The Clifton Opera House is located at 5 So Clay Street, Clifton. Call 937.767.2343 for more information.